In Capitol, AT&T and Bells Fight to Control Web Access

NY Times: In Capitol, AT&T and Bells Fight to Control Web Access. The battle is over the two main technologies that give consumers high-speed, or broadband, Internet access: cable modem service offered by companies like AT&T and digital subscriber lines, or D.S.L., provided by phone companies. Both sides say they have consumers' interests at heart.… Continue reading In Capitol, AT&T and Bells Fight to Control Web Access

I love taking the train to work.

It's been a while since I've been on the train, since I used to have to take my son to school. Now I ride from Santa Clara to Millbrae every day. It's one hour each way.

You know, the train ride is my most creative and productive two hours of the day. Why?

Cause you freaking people can't bother me! Oh, sorry. Heheh. Seriously, it's the one place in my life where I'm not connected to the Internet. That means no email, no meetings, no nothing for an hour.

Just me and my Thinkpad.

Which, is why I'm on the train instead of working at home. UserLand lets me work wherever I'd like, as long as I do what I'm paid to do.

So, I'm playing around with working various places. At home. At Starbucks (I just paid for their WiFi wireless service today, cool!) On the train. At UserLand's office.

I realized the work world is sure changing. Now we're getting decentralized. And we need great knowledge sharing tools. But, I won't go into marketing here. Just wanted to tell you, I love the train. [Scobleizer

I love taking the train to work. It's been a while since I've been on the train, since I used to have to take my son to school. Now I ride from Santa Clara to Millbrae every day. It's one hour each way. You know, the train ride is my most creative and productive two… Continue reading I love taking the train to work.

It's been a while since I've been on the train, since I used to have to take my son to school. Now I ride from Santa Clara to Millbrae every day. It's one hour each way.

You know, the train ride is my most creative and productive two hours of the day. Why?

Cause you freaking people can't bother me! Oh, sorry. Heheh. Seriously, it's the one place in my life where I'm not connected to the Internet. That means no email, no meetings, no nothing for an hour.

Just me and my Thinkpad.

Which, is why I'm on the train instead of working at home. UserLand lets me work wherever I'd like, as long as I do what I'm paid to do.

So, I'm playing around with working various places. At home. At Starbucks (I just paid for their WiFi wireless service today, cool!) On the train. At UserLand's office.

I realized the work world is sure changing. Now we're getting decentralized. And we need great knowledge sharing tools. But, I won't go into marketing here. Just wanted to tell you, I love the train. [Scobleizer

Scripting News

Bjorn Sundstrom: “On software for librarians: they have amazingly high standards for response time and usability. They want free-text searches of the Library of Congress in three seconds round-trip. From anywhere in the world. And they really mean it. It's amazingly fun to build software for them.” [Scripting News]

The Internet Puzzle

Interactive Week: The Internet Puzzle. Don't give up on the Internet or the carriers jockeying for a piece of its traffic just yet. The Internet is growing faster now than it did in the halcyon days of 1998 and 1999, and the race to decide which company will carry the traffic is much closer and… Continue reading The Internet Puzzle

The Real Lesson Of Code Red: Insecurity Is A Way of Life

Internet Week: The Real Lesson Of Code Red: Insecurity Is A Way of Life. Bruce Schneier. If we're going to make Internet security work, we need to think differently. I've put my effort into detection and response, instead of protection, because detection and response are resilient. I've put my effort into people instead of software… Continue reading The Real Lesson Of Code Red: Insecurity Is A Way of Life

source control at Microsoft

Dogfooding Source Control – Joel talks about source control at Microsoft. The main question he brings up is “why doesn't Microsoft use Visual Sourcesafe for all source-control needs?” He rightly points out that most of us feel that “Dogfood is the best food!”. There are sometimes products that don't get dogfooded as well as others,… Continue reading source control at Microsoft

Web Services are overhyped.

This is a common theme with our industry. Remember when Java was overhyped? Remember when Push was? Remember when the Macintosh was?

Whenever something is overhyped, I start looking elsewhere for the real action.

The real opportunity for the average Joe developer (financially) is not by building Web services, it's by building business information services behind the firewall. I think we should call services that run behind the firewall “HTTP Business Services” since my mom and dad can't see them from the World Wide Web.

Most of the programmers who use Microsoft stuff (or even Sun's Java) are building business applications. The kinds you never hear about. They are ripe candidates to build new kinds of business information systems.

For instance, KGO Radio in San Francisco is being run by a Visual Basic app. It works. It helps them run their business. It was probably run by a developer who didn't really care that his app is helping Microsoft sell a few copies of Windows. The developer probably got paid a good fee to create the app. He or she is happy.

Those are the kinds of folks that are using .NET. Will the next version of Quake be written in a .NET language? Of course not. The next version of RedHat Linux? Of course not. The next version of UserLand Frontier? Of course not. The great folks who write those kinds of apps, platforms, and OS's aren't the average Joe developer that Microsoft cares about (if they did, a stretch limo would appear, and they'd buy you, just like they did to Anders Hejlsberg when he worked at Borland).

Why do I believe that HTTP Business Services are underhyped?

Jon Rauschenberger, one of the guys at Clarity Consulting

Web Services are overhyped. This is a common theme with our industry. Remember when Java was overhyped? Remember when Push was? Remember when the Macintosh was? Whenever something is overhyped, I start looking elsewhere for the real action. The real opportunity for the average Joe developer (financially) is not by building Web services, it's by building business… Continue reading

Web Services are overhyped.

This is a common theme with our industry. Remember when Java was overhyped? Remember when Push was? Remember when the Macintosh was?

Whenever something is overhyped, I start looking elsewhere for the real action.

The real opportunity for the average Joe developer (financially) is not by building Web services, it's by building business information services behind the firewall. I think we should call services that run behind the firewall “HTTP Business Services” since my mom and dad can't see them from the World Wide Web.

Most of the programmers who use Microsoft stuff (or even Sun's Java) are building business applications. The kinds you never hear about. They are ripe candidates to build new kinds of business information systems.

For instance, KGO Radio in San Francisco is being run by a Visual Basic app. It works. It helps them run their business. It was probably run by a developer who didn't really care that his app is helping Microsoft sell a few copies of Windows. The developer probably got paid a good fee to create the app. He or she is happy.

Those are the kinds of folks that are using .NET. Will the next version of Quake be written in a .NET language? Of course not. The next version of RedHat Linux? Of course not. The next version of UserLand Frontier? Of course not. The great folks who write those kinds of apps, platforms, and OS's aren't the average Joe developer that Microsoft cares about (if they did, a stretch limo would appear, and they'd buy you, just like they did to Anders Hejlsberg when he worked at Borland).

Why do I believe that HTTP Business Services are underhyped?

Jon Rauschenberger, one of the guys at Clarity Consulting

The Failure of Tech Journalism

Netslaves: The Failure of Tech Journalism. “If PC Magazine wants to shill for every crappy Microsoft product and conform their coverage to Microsoft's marketing aims, that is their right. However, it doesn't' have anything to do with reality, fairness or the standards to which journalists should be held to.” [Scripting News]

Microsoft's scripting strategy

Whitepaper: Microsoft's scripting strategy. “Sorry no migration of existing code. It's a one-way street. The developers come in, but they can't bring their code with them.” [Scripting News]