Monthly Archives: September 2003

Enterprise IA Roadmap from Lou Rosenfeld

Enterprise IA Roadmap from Lou Rosenfeld. Lou Rosenfeld shares some thoughts from his current Enterprise Information Architecture seminars with his EIA Roadmap – a diagram showing the progression of IA within the enterprise. As well as laying out a course for pursuing IA within an organization, it acts as an interesting measure of capability and maturity of IA within the organization.

Speaking of EIA, I've been thinking about the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) that measures competence in software development. When there finally is a central UX advocacy organization, it would be interesting to see what kind of UXCMM would be possible. There is already the Usability Maturity Model but that lacks integration across UX disciplines (IA, ID, etc.) If you're interested, here's more details on the UM model. [34 pg pdf] [ia/ – information architecture news]

Fire your website

Fire your website.

Erik Heels weighs in with some cogent observations about the value of using weblog software to manage your website (in his case, for his law firm, but the lessons apply equally well to other businesses).

In particular, Erik provides a good review of several software systems (Radio Userland, Movable Type), discusses aggregators, and lists a few tips for leveraging the platform effectively. The article is well worth reading.

Over at EmploymentBlawg, George asks why Erik doesn’t review Blogger. I can’t speak for Erik, but I can add my $.02 — Blogger’s fine for basic weblog updating, but falls far short when it comes to managing non-blog content. Erik’s really talking about managing an entire web presence with the weblog software as the infrastructure. That’s possible with Radio and Movable Type, but almost impossible with Blogger.

There is no doubt in my mind that web content management systems that grow out of today’s crop of blog apps (in particular, keep your eye on Movable Type’s creators, Six Apart) are the disruptive technology that will threaten the established WCM players (think Documentum, Interwoven, Vignette).  [tins ::: Rick Klau's weblog]

InterAction question from the blogosphere

InterAction question from the blogosphere.

Former Mintz Levin CIO Ron Friedmann saw our press release announcing InterAction 5.1, and also noticed our announcement of InterAction Contact Verifier. Contact Verifier allows firms to manage the updating of contact data by letting contacts themselves visit a secure website and provide their updated contact information.

Ron asked today at his blog:

It would be nice (and perhaps already possible, I’m not up on all of the technical product specs) to integrate this feature with e-newsletters that law firms regularly broadcast (or perhaps narrowcast is a better description). If each message contained contact data verification at the beginning or end of the substantive news, law firms might find it easier to maintain up-to-date contact information.

Bingo. Contact Verifier will do this out of the box — and provide firms with a powerful way of letting their contacts do the hard work of keeping the contact data accurate.  [tins ::: Rick Klau's weblog]

National Public Radio is not very public

National Public Radio is not very public.

They like to say “you own the station,” it's one of the big marketing pitches, but it's not true. There's very little to distinguish a public radio station from commercial one. The major difference is the business model. NPR stations sell subscriptions and commercial stations don't. But the distinction is fading because public radio stations are running more commercial-like spots all the time. See the bit about conference sponsorships earlier this week. The NPR stations don't disclaim or disclose much, so it's reasonable to assume that they sell speaking spots too, stuff that sounds like editorial but is really commercial.  [Scripting News]

Macromedia Central – Public Beta

Macromedia Central – Public Beta. Finally, everyone else can get their hands on what a few of us have been very excited about for a while: Macromedia Central is now in public beta! Mike Chambers has more to say about this in his blog but I'd urge you to install it and take it for a spin. Bear in mind that it's beta software so go and read the FAQ and other product information first!  [An Architect's View]

During ConstructionMost software managers know what good office space would be like, and they know they don't have it, and can't have it. Office space seems to be the one thing that nobody can get right and nobody can do anything about. There's a ten year lease, and whenever the company moves the last person anybody asks about how to design the space is the manager of the software team, who finds out what his new veal-fattening pens, uh, cubicle farm is going to be like for the first time on the Monday after the move-in.

Well, it's my own damn company and I can do something about it, so I did.

Bionic Office

During ConstructionMost software managers know what good office space would be like, and they know they don't have it, and can't have it. Office space seems to be the one thing that nobody can get right and nobody can do anything about. There's a ten year lease, and whenever the company moves the last person anybody asks about how to design the space is the manager of the software team, who finds out what his new veal-fattening pens, uh, cubicle farm is going to be like for the first time on the Monday after the move-in.

Well, it's my own damn company and I can do something about it, so I did.

Bionic Office  [Joel on Software]