Law firms that tout their techno-wizardry – I have had the opportunity recently to check out a few law firm websites and marketing brochures.  What fascinates me most is are the firms that engage in mindless bloviating about their technological prowess.  One law firm cites (as proof of its commitment to use of technology) the fact that “PCs are on the desk of every lawyer, paralegal, secretary, and staff person.” One wonders if, “on some attorneys' desks” the PC functions as an art object rather than a productivity tool.

Another firm, whose website hasn't been updated since it was first created, makes much ado over the fact that the firm has HP printers and uses Word 97.

What's interesting about these public displays of techno-affection is not that they are so pathetically out-of-step with a true vision of what technology can do in a law firm.  It's that the firms are obviously touting their prowess as a marketing ploy, which is fine if the commitment to use technology is real.   The not-so-subtle message they seek to convey is that they are on the cutting edge of efficiency and state-of-the-art lawyering.  In short, they are saying “we are diligent and know how to use technology to help you with your case.”  Yeah, except when it comes to that very difficult and convoluted task called 'updating your website.'  [Ernie the Attorney

Law firms that tout their techno-wizardry – I have had the opportunity recently to check out a few law firm websites and marketing brochures.  What fascinates me most is are the firms that engage in mindless bloviating about their technological prowess.  One law firm cites (as proof of its commitment to use of technology) the fact that “PCs are on the desk of every lawyer, paralegal, secretary, and staff person.” One wonders if, “on some attorneys' desks” the PC functions as an art object rather than a productivity tool.

Another firm, whose website hasn't been updated since it was first created, makes much ado over the fact that the firm has HP printers and uses Word 97.

What's interesting about these public displays of techno-affection is not that they are so pathetically out-of-step with a true vision of what technology can do in a law firm.  It's that the firms are obviously touting their prowess as a marketing ploy, which is fine if the commitment to use technology is real.   The not-so-subtle message they seek to convey is that they are on the cutting edge of efficiency and state-of-the-art lawyering.  In short, they are saying “we are diligent and know how to use technology to help you with your case.”  Yeah, except when it comes to that very difficult and convoluted task called 'updating your website.'  [Ernie the Attorney]

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