Monthly Archives: March 2002

Several people have emailed me to let me know of programs using ADOdb. I'm very pleased with the diversity and quality of their apps. Good work!

 BugIn

Several people have emailed me to let me know of programs using ADOdb. I'm very pleased with the diversity and quality of their apps. Good work!

 BugIn BugIn' is a PHP/MySQL powered bug/issue tracking system. It is intended to be powerful, but lightweight enough that it doesn't need constant modification, or a full-time DB administrator.

 Publish Button is an innovative Web Content Management System designed for print and web publishers. Its focus is the separation of content from graphic design and web page logic. Publish Button, in addition to providing visual management of content, allows web applications using your content to be created through its sophisticated, web-based layout and logic editor. Commercial app.

 MyPHPblog is a weblog application using MySQL and PHP4 for those wanting a free and easy way to create their own 'blogs'. MyPHPblog allows for the collaboration of many users into a single blog and creation of multiple blogs.

 QuB (Query Builder) from InterAkt manages your SQL queries for MySQL, PostgreSQL and Access databases. Visual query editing is finally available to Ultradev users (PHP only version). QuB centralizes the SQL queries in a single repository, provides a graphical interface for editing them and has tight integration with Ultradev 4 (PHAkt and ImpAKT). Commercial app.

[PHP Everywhere]

Singlefile

“Jason Fried of Spinfree (and 37Signals) has released Singlefile, a Web service that allows you to keep track of your book collection. Jason is one of the best user interface designers I know. In a year or two when I start my own company, I'm going to recruit Jason (and a few other people I admire). I've been discussing this Singlefile idea with Jason for about three years ever since we got in touch with each other after I asked him about creating a Web front-end to his Filemaker run-time application called BookBin which does the same thing. I also floated this idea when I was working at Borders.com but the management [typically] ignored me. Back in 1999 I was playing around with the idea of developing a startup around this concept and got so far as developing some preliminary HTML mockups. I stopped development on the idea and Jason forged ahead. Singlefile is the end result. Awesome.” [Camworld]

The only thing Winer's announcement [re: NY Times syndication] means is that the NYT is still clueless (and reaffirms a lot of suspicions people had about working with Winer on things like RSS 0.92).

Brian Carnell: “The only thing Winer's announcement [re: NY Times syndication] means is that the NYT is still clueless (and reaffirms a lot of suspicions people had about working with Winer on things like RSS 0.92).” [via Camworld]

Toronto Public Library

Score one for the Toronto Public Library. Their SmallBizXpress service looks pretty spiffy, and it lets you personalize the page, too (something we're investigating doing at SLS). I also like how the TPL advertises their Ask a Librarian email reference service. Not only do they break it down into request forms for Adults & Teens and Kids up to Grade 6, but the tag line for the service is “Email a question and receive an answer within 24 hours? AMAZING!” Nice thinking on their part, since most email reference sites take the opposite tact and sternly warn users that they'll be lucky to get an answer in 24-48 hours and even then there's no guarantee. Not to mention that their site is top-notch all the way around in terms of usability, legibility, navigation, use of color, and room for white space. Nice job, TPL! [via WEB4LIB] [The Shifted Librarian]

For the record, I'm complex, not disorganized. Please strike all references to “messy desks” from my past and future work evaluations.

“But why do we pile documents instead of filing them? Because piles represent the process of active, ongoing thinking. The psychologist Alison Kidd, whose research Sellen and Harper refer to extensively, argues that “knowledge workers” use the physical space of the desktop to hold “ideas which they cannot yet categorize or even decide how they might use.” The messy desk is not necessarily a sign of disorganization. It may be a sign of complexity: those who deal with many unresolved ideas simultaneously cannot sort and file the papers on their desks, because they haven't yet sorted and filed the ideas in their head. Kidd writes that many of the people she talked to use the papers on their desks as contextual cues to “recover a complex set of threads without difficulty and delay” when they come in on a Monday morning, or after their work has been interrupted by a phone call. What we see when we look at the piles on our desks is, in a sense, the contents of our brains.” [at The New Yorker

For the record, I'm complex, not disorganized. Please strike all references to “messy desks” from my past and future work evaluations.

“But why do we pile documents instead of filing them? Because piles represent the process of active, ongoing thinking. The psychologist Alison Kidd, whose research Sellen and Harper refer to extensively, argues that “knowledge workers” use the physical space of the desktop to hold “ideas which they cannot yet categorize or even decide how they might use.” The messy desk is not necessarily a sign of disorganization. It may be a sign of complexity: those who deal with many unresolved ideas simultaneously cannot sort and file the papers on their desks, because they haven't yet sorted and filed the ideas in their head. Kidd writes that many of the people she talked to use the papers on their desks as contextual cues to “recover a complex set of threads without difficulty and delay” when they come in on a Monday morning, or after their work has been interrupted by a phone call. What we see when we look at the piles on our desks is, in a sense, the contents of our brains.” [at The New Yorker, via MeFi]

Oh, and it talks about Melvil Dewey (“the anti-Walt Whitman”), his Library Bureau (“essentially the Office Depot of his day”), and vertical files. I really have to find time to read the rest of this book someday, as I think I've become a Gladwell groupie. [The Shifted Librarian]

Outlining on the Internet 

Outlining on the Internet 

At first outlining may not seem related to the Internet, but if you look again, you'll see lots of possibilities.

First and foremost, the Internet is a communication enviornment. Email, instant messaging, the Web, each offer a different form of communication, allowing one person to speak to many people, publicly or in private; or allowing just two people to communicate, and most points inbetween.

But outlining is also about communication. Used by engineers, managers, marketers, teachers, students, librarians, consultants, accountants, speech writers, scholars; people who think for a living use outliners not only to communicate with others, they use outliners to process ideas, to sort out complex problems and find the hidden simplicity. For computer-based brainstorming, organizing and presenting, no tool can beat an outliner.

Now imagine an outliner that works on the Internet. In your bibliography, you cite a source. Link to it. When a reader double-clicks on the headline, the document expands, in place. Copy the citation into another outline, and you've got another link. Linking and outlining over the Internet. This is the start of something big. [Scripting News]