K-Log integration with e-mail: Integration of e-mail and Weblogs is a goal of the fully functional K-Log client (Radio and Manila have this capability).

It may be advantageous to post all e-mail to the Web or the Intranet.  If used in conjunction with an automated categorization scheme it could provide nice benefits.  Although I think it would quickly get out of hand.  Also, I am not sure many people would want their entire e-mail on the Web or Intranet for everyone to read.

More interesting to me is the concept of e-mail promotion.  E-mail promotion allows me to take great e-mail interactions and post them to my K-Log.  By prmoting the e-mail, I am telling my readers that I think this e-mail is worth reading.  Additionally, by posting the e-mail I introduce it into my time-organized K-Log archive.  From my perspective, my K-Log archive is a repository of everything I am thinking and doing.  It provides a context to my activities like nothing else (Doc would call it a story).  For example, I could look back a month ago to quickly find out what I was working on, what I was thinking at the time, etc.  E-mail systems don't provide me that level of context.

Perhaps, we could combine the two ideas in an innovative way using a desktop K-Log client.  In this hybrid system, I would forward all of my e-mail to my desktop K-Log client.  I would also forward all of my IM conversations.  All of this content would be searchable using a desktop search engine and viewable via a browser.  I would treat this content as background material for my K-Log.

I could promote the e-mails I think deserve it, and leave the rest in the bin.  It would remain private until I changed its status by promoting it.  I would also have the ability to sift and sort through this background material to develop interesting directories of information that deserve promotion.  For example:  a long-running conversation with a client or business partner.

Ultimately, the K-Log will become the repository for every bit of digital information you have access to.  Most of it will be background material that can be sifted and sorted.  Some elements will make it into the foreground via promotion and serve as a way to communicate to others what you thought was important that they should know.  [John Robb's Radio Weblog

K-Log integration with e-mail: Integration of e-mail and Weblogs is a goal of the fully functional K-Log client (Radio and Manila have this capability).

It may be advantageous to post all e-mail to the Web or the Intranet.  If used in conjunction with an automated categorization scheme it could provide nice benefits.  Although I think it would quickly get out of hand.  Also, I am not sure many people would want their entire e-mail on the Web or Intranet for everyone to read.

More interesting to me is the concept of e-mail promotion.  E-mail promotion allows me to take great e-mail interactions and post them to my K-Log.  By prmoting the e-mail, I am telling my readers that I think this e-mail is worth reading.  Additionally, by posting the e-mail I introduce it into my time-organized K-Log archive.  From my perspective, my K-Log archive is a repository of everything I am thinking and doing.  It provides a context to my activities like nothing else (Doc would call it a story).  For example, I could look back a month ago to quickly find out what I was working on, what I was thinking at the time, etc.  E-mail systems don't provide me that level of context.

Perhaps, we could combine the two ideas in an innovative way using a desktop K-Log client.  In this hybrid system, I would forward all of my e-mail to my desktop K-Log client.  I would also forward all of my IM conversations.  All of this content would be searchable using a desktop search engine and viewable via a browser.  I would treat this content as background material for my K-Log.

I could promote the e-mails I think deserve it, and leave the rest in the bin.  It would remain private until I changed its status by promoting it.  I would also have the ability to sift and sort through this background material to develop interesting directories of information that deserve promotion.  For example:  a long-running conversation with a client or business partner.

Ultimately, the K-Log will become the repository for every bit of digital information you have access to.  Most of it will be background material that can be sifted and sorted.  Some elements will make it into the foreground via promotion and serve as a way to communicate to others what you thought was important that they should know.  [John Robb's Radio Weblog]

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